A TADS TADS TADS TADS World

The TADS interpreter scene on Mac OS X is a bit like the browser scene. There are more of them than you’d expect for a minority platform, and they embody different philosophical approaches.

The saying goes: “Cheap, fast, or good: pick two.” I tried “perfect” with my MacTADS project and wound up never finishing it at all, so it’s no surprise that the authors of the following interpreters made a different set of compromises in order to get their applications out the door.

(The observations below are more about the UI than a detailed review of gameplay.)

QTads
First, Nikos Chantziaras wrote FrobTADS, a command-line port of TADS that replaces the old, crufty port mentioned in this post and used in Uli Kusterer’s TADS Workbench for Macintosh.

Second, he built a GUI TADS interpreter on top of that, called QTads. As ANSI C and POSIX are to FrobTADS, Trolltech‘s Qt library is to QTads: if you support those APIs, FrobTADS and QTads respectively can be built for your platform.

This approach led to a full-featured interpreter for the Mac platform without needing someone to commit full-time to it. QTads even has some niceties not in other Mac interpreters, such as a font/color “preview” panel and theme sets.

The downside is that QTads is a Mac application the same way Eclipse is a Mac application. Colorful, but not exactly native-looking:

QTads Game Menu Screenshot

Huh, an Exit menu item? Never fear, there’s still a regular Quit menu item under the Application menu, but this goes to show we’re not in Cocoa anymore.

As another example, have a look at these two lower right-hand corners of windows:

QTads Lower Right-Hand Window Corner NetNewsWire Lower Right-Hand Window Corner
QTads NetNewsWire

QTads has an ugly black outline around its main scroll view, and its window grow box is half the size of a native Macintosh window grow box. NetNewsWire’s version is provided for comparison.

Finally, if you resize the window, you’ll notice some flickering. QTads eschews OS X’s double-buffering, and instead erases and redraws the edges of its window right before your eyes.

Some of this might be fixable with more work on Qt, but some of it is a deliberate, un-Mac-like style that comes with the territory.

Cugel
Cugel’s author made a different set of compromises. Native? Check. Full-featured user interface? Well, not really. For example, there’s no status bar area at the bottom for a “more” prompt. Such a bar doesn’t come native with the Cocoa scroll view, which is why my in-progress Neutrino main window doesn’t have one yet, either.

But what you get instead is a “Unified Interactive Fiction Player.” It can play not only TADS games, but also Hugo games, Alan games, Glulxe-based games (supported by Inform), and others.

It’s actually pretty cool to look in the Cugel package and see the individual interpreter utilities for all these languages.

Ben Hines MaxTADS OS X port
Ben Hines made a third set of compromises. My impression is that in 2002, he saw that there was already a perfectly good OS 9 TADS interpreter, Andrew Plotkin’s MaxTADS. He also saw that Apple provided a quick way to port such Toolbox-based code to OS X, the Carbon APIs.

So he “ported” MaxTADS to Carbon, and by “ported” I mean that he made the fewest changes possible to the codebase and resources so it would build and run as a Carbon application on 9 and X. The UI remained entirely unchanged, and it looks more and more anomalous on subsequent versions of OS X. For example:

MaxTADS Carbon Port UI

Yes, that’s a System 7-style textbox you see!

Here’s another issue. Two quit menus:

MaxTADS Carbon Port Menu

The Cmd-Q keystroke shortcut does nothing, by the way. You have to select the menu item by mouse.

The upside of all the hurried work? This was the very first native OS X TADS GUI-based interpreter. The other two interpreters mentioned above were released two years or more after this MaxTADS port.